Of A Feather

Of A Feather

A Brief History of American Birding

Book - 2007 | 1st ed
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Houghton
From the moment Europeans arrived in North America, they were awestruck by a continent awash with birds—great flocks of wild pigeons, prairies teeming with grouse, woodlands alive with brilliantly colored songbirds. Of a Feather traces the colorful origins of American birding: the frontier ornithologists who collected eggs between border skirmishes; the society matrons who organized the first effective conservation movement; and the luminaries with checkered pasts, such as Alexander Wilson (a convicted blackmailer) and the endlessly self-mythologizing John James Audubon. Scott Weidensaul also recounts the explosive growth of modern birding that began when an awkward schoolteacher named Roger Tory Peterson published A Field Guide to the Birds in 1934. Today birding counts iPod-wearing teens and obsessive "listers" among its tens of millions of participants, making what was once an eccentric hobby into something so completely mainstream it’s now (almost) cool. This compulsively readable popular history will surely find a roost on every birder’s shelf.


Baker & Taylor
A colorful history of American ornithology details the origins and development of birding in North America, from the colonial era to the rise of modern birding under the auspices of educator-naturalist Roger Tory Peterson, who first published A Field Guide to the Birds in 1934.

Harcourt Publishing
F rom the moment Europeans arrived in North America, they were awestruck by a continent awash with birds—great flocks of wild pigeons, prairies teeming with grouse, woodlands alive with brilliantly colored songbirds. Of a Feather traces the colorful origins of American birding: the frontier ornithologists who collected eggs between border skirmishes; the society matrons who organized the first effective conservation movement; and the luminaries with checkered pasts, such as Alexander Wilson (a convicted blackmailer) and the endlessly self-mythologizing John James Audubon. Scott Weidensaul also recounts the explosive growth of modern birding that began when an awkward schoolteacher named Roger Tory Peterson published A Field Guide to the Birds in 1934. Today birding counts iPod-wearing teens and obsessive "listers" among its tens of millions of participants, making what was once an eccentric hobby into something so completely mainstream it’s now (almost) cool. This compulsively readable popular history will surely find a roost on every birder’s shelf.



Baker
& Taylor

Traces the origins of bird watching and ornithology in the United States, from the scientists who collected eggs on the frontier while dodging Native Americans through the publication of Peterson's first field guide to birds.

Publisher: Orlando : Harcourt, c2007
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780151012473
0151012474
Branch Call Number: 598 WEI
Characteristics: 358 p. : ill. ; 24 cm

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Birdstalker
Jan 04, 2014

I quite enjoyed this book : a history of birding in the United States. The author is quite knowledgeable in this area, but I found him to jump around a bit too much in some chapters. all in all a very good book for a birder who wants to know more about who, how and when birding became the hobby it is today in America.

u
uncommonreader
Aug 02, 2012

As a birder, I learned a few interesting details, but overall not a great book.

g
Gardengallivant
Aug 28, 2010

Birders of all types from those obsessive 'Twitchers' who compile life lists and translate bird calls for mnemonic phrases to those 'Dudes' who just call them all LBJs will enjoy the characters portrayed in this book.

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