Sugarcane Academy

Sugarcane Academy

How A New Orleans Teacher and His Storm-struck Students Created A School to Remember

Book - 2007 | 1st ed
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Houghton
Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, taking lives and livelihoods and displacing thousands. Because the hurricane struck at the beginning of the school year, the city’s children were among those most affected. Michael Tisserand, former editor of the alternative cultural newspaper Gambit Weekly, evacuated with his family to New Iberia, Louisiana. Then, rather than waiting to find out when?or if?schools in New Orleans would reopen, Tisserand and other parents persuaded one of his children’s teachers, Paul Reynaud, to start a school among the sugarcane fields.

So was born the Sugarcane Academy?as the children themselves named it?and so also began an experience none of Reynaud’s pupils will ever forget. This inspiring book shows how a dedicated teacher made the best out of the worst situation, and how the children of New Orleans, of all backgrounds and races, adjusted to Katrina’s consequences.


Sugarcane Academy: Building a School After Katrina tells the story of one adventurous teacher and his one-room schoolhouse. Circling around Mr. Reynaud's educational oasis are parents coping with losing their homes and trying to plan new futures, while learning to live on food stamps and FEMA assistance checks. It's a story of an unexpected journey to Cajun country for a classroom of children who are among the youngest victims of a national disaster.

Sugarcane Academy also tells the stories of other evacuee children who landed in the Lafayette area. A boy born of Ukranian parents who holed up in a New Orleans medical center for four days after the hurricane, telling his mother he couldn't stop thinking about death. An ad-hoc tutoring room set up in the Cajundome, one of the sports arenas-turned-massive shelters that line Interstate 10 from Baton Rouge through Texas. There, counselors are using art and play to help children who witnessed tragedies, who lost family members. Through memoir, essay and reporting, the book will also reveal how race and class issues factor in both education and a natural disaster.

We are still understanding how Katrina tore into the lives of children. Sugarcane Academy will profile one remarkable teacher and a group of children as they persevere through the storm's aftermath. It will also show that, even under the most difficult of circumstances, you can still find moments of sweetness.


Baker & Taylor
Describes how a group of parents, displaced from New Orleans following hurricane Katrinia, joined forces with teacher Paul Reynaud to start a school for their children among the sugarcane fields of New Iberia, Louisiana, and how a dedicated teacher created an extraordinary learning experience for the children of New Orleans, of all backrounds and races, at the "Sugarcane Academy." Original.

Harcourt Publishing
Sugarcane Academy: Building a School After Katrina tells the story of one adventurous teacher and his one-room schoolhouse. Circling around Mr. Reynaud's educational oasis are parents coping with losing their homes and trying to plan new futures, while learning to live on food stamps and FEMA assistance checks. It's a story of an unexpected journey to Cajun country for a classroom of children who are among the youngest victims of a national disaster.

Sugarcane Academy also tells the stories of other evacuee children who landed in the Lafayette area. A boy born of Ukranian parents who holed up in a New Orleans medical center for four days after the hurricane, telling his mother he couldn't stop thinking about death. An ad-hoc tutoring room set up in the Cajundome, one of the sports arenas-turned-massive shelters that line Interstate 10 from Baton Rouge through Texas. There, counselors are using art and play to help children who witnessed tragedies, who lost family members. Through memoir, essay and reporting, the book will also reveal how race and class issues factor in both education and a natural disaster.

We are still understanding how Katrina tore into the lives of children. Sugarcane Academy will profile one remarkable teacher and a group of children as they persevere through the storm's aftermath. It will also show that, even under the most difficult of circumstances, you can still find moments of sweetness.

Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, taking lives and livelihoods and displacing thousands. Because the hurricane struck at the beginning of the school year, the city’s children were among those most affected. Michael Tisserand, former editor of the alternative cultural newspaper Gambit Weekly, evacuated with his family to New Iberia, Louisiana. Then, rather than waiting to find out when—or if—schools in New Orleans would reopen, Tisserand and other parents persuaded one of his children’s teachers, Paul Reynaud, to start a school among the sugarcane fields.

So was born the Sugarcane Academy—as the children themselves named it—and so also began an experience none of Reynaud’s pupils will ever forget. This inspiring book shows how a dedicated teacher made the best out of the worst situation, and how the children of New Orleans, of all backgrounds and races, adjusted to Katrina’s consequences.


Baker
& Taylor

Describes how a group of parents, displaced from New Orleans following hurricane Katrina, joined forces with teacher Paul Reynaud to start a school for their children among the sugarcane fields of New Iberia, Louisiana.

Publisher: Orlando, Fla. : Harcourt, c2007
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780156031899
0156031892
Branch Call Number: 372.976335 TIS
Characteristics: 184 p. ; 21 cm

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